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What Are the Dreams of an Addict?

It may be hard even to start thinking about dreams if you’re addicted to drugs. When you’re in the middle of amphetamine addiction, sometimes all you can think about is drugs: how to get the money for them, where to get them, when to take them. It may seem like there’s no room for dreams in your life.

Not Trusting Yourself

As an amphetamine addict, I started not to trust my dreams. When you’re high, your head begins to fill with fantasies. You feel invincible. But then you crash, and you feel like a fool. I could barely keep myself from spending every dollar I had on drugs. Who was I to have dreams?

Staying Positive

Staying hopeful is hard. But I knew I still had to keep dreaming if I ever wanted to change my life and beat my amphetamine addiction. But I didn’t even know where to begin. I saw where I wanted to go, but not how I would get there.

It’s important that your dreams are paired with a concrete plan. An addict can’t afford to get ahead of himself. During my worst days, I would make myself promises that I would quit immediately, cold turkey. I had no support, no plan, and I failed every single time.

Dream Big, Dream Smart

You’re not going to make it out of this if you can’t picture yourself succeeding. Here’s some advice on how you can dream while still keeping your feet on the ground.

  • Reward small steps
    This is going to be a hard and long journey. Celebrate the small victories, and involve your loved ones, if you can.
  • Be logical about failure
    If you know there will be setbacks along the way, it is easier to get perspective once they happen. If you expect to be perfect, it’ll be a rough surprise when you’re not. If you accept that you are human, you give yourself a much better chance of making your recovery a successful one.
  • Keep track
    It can easy to think you’re not making progress. If you track how you are doing, you can reward yourself for those small improvements that might otherwise go unnoticed.
  • Be realistic about the time it will take to recover
    You didn’t become an addict in a day, and you’re not going to recover in a day. Be patient. Trust that you’ll reach your goal, even if it feels far away. Focus on small steps you can take. You’ll be surprised to see how far you’ve come.

You Can Make It if You Trust in Yourself

During my worst days, I never would have imagined how far I would eventually go. If you’re struggling now, I’m here to remind you that things can change, as long as you believe they can. Keep dreaming, and focus on the steps you can take right now, and you’ll be on the road to recovery.